Deals, News, Reviews & Writer’s Resources

Writing A Query Letter

by Jodi Meadows

"... YOUR CHANCE TO SHINE:

I like queries. No, I love them. They’re such short, humble things, but their importance is undeniable. Queries are the initial step to nabbing an agent. They’re your first impression, and your best chance at getting an agent to pay attention to you.

Considering how drastically queries can affect careers, it always shocks me when writers carelessly throw something together, assuming it will be adequate. Which is not to say I think people should get worked up over things like margins and which paragraph your wordcount/genre should be in. There’s also no point in trying to find magic offer-of-representation-words. They don’t exist. No, you must query responsibly and realistically.

The purpose of a query is to make someone so...

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Query letter

What Are You Looking Forward to Reading, Martha A. Sandweiss?

by David Haglund, Critical Mass Blog| Aug-04-2010

" ...This summer I am looking forward to reading the bound galleys of two books forthcoming in fall 2010. For years, I have heard these authors talk about their struggles with the evidence, and now I get to see what they’ve done with it. Virginia Scharff’s The Women Jefferson Loved takes a fresh look at the facts hidden in plain sight to reimagine the Founding Father as a man caught up by the demands of love and the pull of family tragedy. Ann Fabian’s The Skull Collectors: Race, Science and America’s Unburied Dead unravels the improbable story of how and why American scientists collected human heads for the nation...

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Greetings Friends,

The Strothman Agency has a lot of exciting deals to share and a few new
titles to recommend for your late summer/early fall reading list.

We are pleased to announce five new sales:

*    Non-Fiction: Science-Claire Wachtel at Harper won at auction World
rights to The Teenage Brain, by Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical
School and senior associate in neurology at Children's Hospital Boston
Frances Jensen, M.D., with Amy Ellis Nutt. The Teenage Brain is the latest
scientific research to unlock the secrets of adolescent behavior and explain
what is happening at the interface of a teenager's brain and the world.

*    Non-Fiction: Science-Leslie Meredith at Free Press bought World
rights to Choke author University of Chicago professor Dr. Sian Beilock's
second book,...

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Newsletter

Non-fiction: Science : Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and senior associate in neurology at Children's Hospital Boston Frances Jensen, M.D., with Amy Ellis Nutt's THE TEENAGE BRAIN, the latest scientific research to unlock the secrets of adolescent behavior and explain what is happening at the interface of a teenager's brain and the world, to Claire Wachtel at Harper, in a major deal, at auction, by Wendy Strothman at The Strothman Agency (World).

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CHOKE author Dr. Sian Beilock's second book, about embodied cognition, again to Leslie Meredith at Free Press, in a good deal, by Wendy Strothman at The Strothman Agency (World).

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Sian Beilock

Non-fiction: History/Politics/Current Affairs:  Brown University professor Michael Satlow's HOW THE BIBLE BECAME HOLY, to Jennifer Banks at Yale University Press, in a very nice deal, at auction, by Wendy Strothman at The Strothman Agency (World).

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Canadian Authors Donate Books to Los Angeles School Libraries

By Lauren Barack July 28, 201, School Library Journal

"Children's author Helaine Becker launched an international book drive - after recently seeing an empty library shelf at Chavez Elementary School in Long Beach, CA.

"It made me so mad, especially since I grew up in the U.S., and I went to public school, as did my parents and grandparents," she says the Canadian author by email. "Today's kids deserve the same opportunities we had."

That's why she's using Twitter, Facebook, and her blog to get the word out about Air lift to LA, a grassroots effort to provide...

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A Puffin Comeback

Atlantic puffins had nearly vanished from the Maine coast until a young biologist defied conventional wisdom to lure them home
By Michelle Nijhuis, Smithsonian magazine, June 2010

"By 1901, only a single pair of Atlantic puffins was known to nest in the United States—on Matinicus Rock, a barren island 20 miles from the Maine coast. Wildlife enthusiasts paid the lighthouse keeper to protect the two birds from hunters.

Things began to change in 1918, when the Migratory Bird Treaty Act banned the killing of many wild birds in the United States. Slowly, puffins returned to Matinicus Rock.

But not to the rest of Maine. Islands that puffins had once inhabited had become enemy territory, occupied by colonies of large, aggressive, predatory gulls that thrived on the debris generated by a growing human population. Though puffins endured elsewhere in their historic range—the...

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Lit Agent Lauren MacLeod Has "Sweet Spot" for Funny Books

"Lauren MacLeod of the Strothman Agency is poised to help her clients through the ebook revolution. In this interview, she tells us why her agency only takes books that they are passionate about, and why the ebook is not the death of publishing.

What is your title and who do you work for?
I'm a literary agent with The Strothman Agency. I'm terrific at what I do because I stay very dialed into all the digital changes authors are facing both in regards to e-book and publicity and marketing. This puts me in a better position to negotiate on my clients behalf as well as give advice. Furthermore--though I suspect this is true of many agents and perhaps even most people in the publishing industry--I truly love my work and there is nothing I'd rather be doing. If I won the...

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The Medium Is the Medium

"Recently, book publishers got some good news. Researchers gave 852 disadvantaged students 12 books (of their own choosing) to take home at the end of the school year. They did this for three successive years.

Then the researchers, led by Richard Allington of the University of Tennessee, looked at those students’ test scores. They found that the students who brought the books home had significantly higher reading scores than other students. These students were less affected by the “summer slide” — the decline that especially afflicts lower-income students during the vacation months. In fact, just having those 12...

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Submission Guidelines

Detailed instructions for writers interested in submitting a query to us.

Proposal Writing Suggestions

Our author's guide to writing  Non-Fiction proposals.